Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Latest Health Research


Complete reports here: https://healthnewsreport.blogspot.com/

Meditation
Meditation adapts the brain to respond better to feedback
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 27 minutes ago
In a new study in the *Journal of Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience* researchers from the University of Surrey have discovered a link between meditation and how individuals respond to feedback. Participants in the study, a mixture of experienced, novice and non-meditators, were trained to select images associated with a reward. Each pair of images had varying probabilities of a reward e.g. images that result in a reward 80 per cent of the time versus those that result in a reward 20 per cent of the time. Participants eventually learnt to select the pairing with the hig… more »

General health
BMI is a good measure of health after all
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 30 minutes ago
A new study from the University of Bristol supports body mass index (BMI) as a useful tool for assessing obesity and health. A simple measure based on weight and height, BMI is widely used to assess if a person is of a healthy weight. But its reliability as a health measure is often criticized, as it does not distinguish fat from muscle and does not tell us where body fat is stored. Using body scans from 2,840 young people aged 10 and 18 in Bristol’s Children of the 90s population study, researchers examined BMI findings against more detailed measures of fat. They studied the effe… more »
Internet therapy apps reduce depression symptoms
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 37 minutes ago
In a sweeping new study, Indiana University psychologists have found that a series of self-guided, internet-based therapy platforms effectively reduce depression. The work, which reviewed 21 pre-existing studies with a total of 4,781 participants, was published in the November issue of the *Journal of Medical Internet Research*. The study was led by Lorenzo Lorenzo-Luaces, a clinical professor in the IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. In the past several years, many internet-based apps and websites have made claims to treat… more »
Millions of low-risk people with diabetes may be testing their blood sugar too often
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 23 hours ago
For people with Type 2 diabetes, the task of testing their blood sugar with a fingertip prick and a drop of blood on a special strip of paper becomes part of everyday life. But a new study suggests that some of them test more often than they need to. In fact, the research shows, 14 percent of people with Type 2 diabetes who don’t require insulin are buying enough test strips to test their blood sugar two or more times a day – when they don’t need to test nearly that frequently according to medical guidelines. That’s costing them time — and sometimes worry — while their insuranc… more »
Naked eye alone is not enough to ensure the accurate diagnosis of skin cancer
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 5 days ago
The visual inspection of a suspicious skin lesion using the naked eye alone is not enough to ensure the accurate diagnosis of skin cancer, a group of experts have concluded following a largescale systematic review of research. The review is published today (Dec 6th) in *The Cochrane Library* as part of a Special Collection of Cochrane Systematic Reviews bringing together a large body of research on the accuracy of tests used to diagnose skin cancer. The suite of eleven reviews was led by Dr Jac Dinnes at the University of Birmingham and supported by the Cochrane Skin Group and a te… more »
Fasting for lab tests isn’t good for patients with diabetes
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
Fasting before getting your blood drawn for cholesterol tests is common practice, but new research from Michigan State University shows it is a contributing factor of low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, in patients who take diabetes medications. The study, published in the *International Journal of Endocrinology*, shows that people with diabetes are more likely to experience FEEHD – fasting-evoked en route hypoglycemia in diabetes – than they would if they hadn’t fasted. The “en route” comes from patients who have an episode while driving to a lab for blood work. Saleh Aldasouqi, an… more »
Why patients lie to their doctors
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
Fear of being judged and embarrassed are among the reasons =- When your doctor asks how often you exercise, do you give her an honest answer? How about when she asks what you’ve been eating lately? If you’ve ever stretched the truth, you’re not alone. 60 to 80 percent of people surveyed have not been forthcoming with their doctors about information that could be relevant to their health, according to a new study. Besides fibbing about diet and exercise, more than a third of respondents didn’t speak up when they disagreed with… more »
Falls are more likely when you’ve had a bad night sleep
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
– Just one night of disturbed sleep means you are less capable to control posture and balance the day after – A single bad night sleep decreases your chance of controlling posture according to researchers at the University of Warwick, who have used state of the art sensors to monitor sleep and balance – Implications could be that older people who have had a bad night sleep are the most at risk of a fall – Innovative solutions of how to prevent imminent falls can now be researched Disturbances during sleep decreases capability to control posture and balance according to researchers f… more »
Night owls may have a higher risk of suffering from heart disease and type 2 diabetes than early risers
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
In the first ever international review of studies analysing whether being an early riser or a night owl can influence your health, researchers have uncovered a growing body of evidence indicating an increased risk of ill health in people with an evening preference as they have more erratic eating patterns and consume more unhealthy foods. The findings have been reported in *Advances in Nutrition* today (Friday 30 November) The human body runs on a 24-hour cycle which is regulated by our internal clock, which is known as a circadian rhythm, or chronotype. This internal clock regula… more »
Aging
Regular problem solving does not protect against mental decline
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 22 hours ago
*Sudoku and crosswords may not offset age-related mental decline, but can boost mental ability over a lifetime* However, they say don’t cross the shiny new chess board or bumper puzzle book off the Christmas list just yet, as the results suggest that regularly engaging in intellectual activities boosts mental ability throughout life and provides a “higher cognitive point” from which to decline. Previous studies have suggested that mental ability can be maintained or improved by exercising the mind in brain teasers such as Sudoku and crossword puzzles. They also suggest that readi… more »
Why older people read more slowly
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 5 days ago
One of the most obvious changes that comes with ageing is that people start doing things more slowly. Numerous studies have shown that ageing also affects language processing. Even neurologically healthy people speak, retrieve words and read more slowly as they get older. But is this slowdown inevitable? Researchers from the Higher School of Economics have been working to answer this question in their article ‘ http://psycnet.apa.org/record/2018-56780-001′.No evidence for strategic nature of age-related slowing in sentence processing’. Researchers from the HSE Centre for Language … more »
Older adults who take up drawing could enhance their memory, according to a new study
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 5 days ago
Researchers from the University of Waterloo found that even if people weren’t good at it, drawing, as a method to help retain new information, was better than re-writing notes, visualization exercises or passively looking at images. “We found that drawing enhanced memory in older adults more than other known study techniques,” said Melissa Meade, PhD candidate in cognitive neuroscience at Waterloo. “We’re really encouraged by these results and are looking into ways that it can be used to help people with dementia, who experience rapid declines in memory and language function.” As … more »
Among older women, the naturally occurring hormone DHEA may preserve bone and muscle mass
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
Women 55 and older have an increased risk of bone and muscle loss but therapy with the hormone Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) may help prevent bone loss and increase muscle mass in older women, according to a new study led by Catherine M. Jankowski, PhD, FACSM, an exercise physiologist and associate professor at the University of Colorado College of Nursing at the Anschutz Medical Campus. The study was published last month in the journal *Clinical Endocrinology* and highlighted in *Endocrinology Today*. Jankowski and colleagues analyzed data from four single-site, double-blinded, pl… more »
Light pollution may cause insomnia in older adults
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
A new study is the first population-based investigation to report a significant association between artificial, outdoor light exposure at night and insomnia, as indicated by older adults’ use of hypnotic drugs. Results show that increasing nighttime levels of artificial, outdoor light exposure, stratified by quartile, were associated with an increased prevalence of hypnotic prescriptions and daily dose intake. Furthermore, older adults exposed to higher levels of artificial, outdoor light at night were more likely to use hypnotic drugs for longer periods or higher daily dosages. “T… more »
Getting older adults to be more active
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
Tailoring exercise plans to elder preferences is key in helping them keep fit and stick with a training plan Norwegian University of Science and Technology [image: IMAGE] *IMAGE: * “Dropout from training programmes is a challenge. Even at start-up, you can identify and help elderly people who are prone to dropping out of a training programme so that we… view more Credit: Photo: Andrea Hegdahl Tiltnes, NTNU Exercise and physical activity are good for our health,
Women benefit from mammography screening beyond age 75
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
Women age 75 years and older should continue to get screening mammograms because of the comparatively high incidence of breast cancer found in this age group, according to a new study being presented next week at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). Guidelines on what age to stop breast cancer screening have been a source of confusion in recent years. In 2009, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released controversial guidelines stating there was not enough evidence… more »
Medications
Statins have low risk of side effects
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 22 hours ago
The cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins have demonstrated substantial benefits in reducing the risk of heart attacks and strokes caused by blood clots (ischemic strokes) in at-risk patients. Since statins are associated with a low risk of side effects, the benefits of taking them outweigh the risks, according to a scientific statement from the American Heart Association that reviewed multiple studies evaluating the safety and potential side effects of these drugs. It is published in the Association’s journal *Circulation: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology*. Ac… more »
Women reject a preventive drug for breast cancer
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
Only around a fifth of women at higher risk of developing breast cancer think they need to take a drug proven to help prevent the disease, according to new research funded by Cancer Research UK and published today (Monday) in *Clinical Breast Cancer*.* Around 72% said they were worried about the long-term effects of tamoxifen and 57% believed that the drug would give them unpleasant side-effects. The researchers, led by a team from the University of Leeds, asked more than 400 healthy women at a higher-risk of breast cancer, from 20 centres across England, whether they thought they … more »
Exercise
Genetic changes associated with physical activity
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 23 hours ago
Time spent sitting, sleeping and moving is determined in part by our genes, University of Oxford researchers have shown. In one of the most detailed projects of its kind, the scientists studied the activity of 91,105 UK Biobank participants who had previously worn an activity monitor on their wrist for a week. The scientists taught machines to automatically identify active and sedentary life from the huge amounts of activity monitor data. They then combined this data with UK Biobank genetic information to reveal 14 genetic regions related to activity, seven new to science, they rep… more »
High-intensity interval exercise:effective strategy to prevent and combat cognitive dysfunction in obese individuals
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 23 hours ago
Obesity, risk of cognitive dysfunction? Study first to use high-intensity interval exercise on obese individuals to test effects on cognitive dysfunction Florida Atlantic University It’s fast-paced, takes less time to do, and burns a lot of calories. High-intensity interval exercise is widely recognized as the most time-efficient and effective way to exercise. In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers from Florida Atlantic University have discovered another important health benefit of these short bursts of intense exercise with rest intervals. It could also be an effecti… more »
Performance on exercise test predicts risk of death from cardiovascular disease and cancer
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 5 days ago
Performance on an exercise test predicts the risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other causes, reports a study presented today at EuroEcho-Imaging 2018.1 Good performance on the test equates to climbing three floors of stairs very fast, or four floors fast, without stopping. The findings underline the importance of fitness for longevity. The study included 12,615 participants with known or suspected coronary artery disease. Participants underwent treadmill exercise echocardiography, in which they were asked to walk or run, gradually increasing the intensity, and … more »
Running a marathon can increase cardiac strain in amateur runners
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
Full marathons may significantly raise concentrations of several biomarkers of strain on the heart, according to new research in *Circulation, Journal of the American Heart Association*. Investigators in Spain compared levels of cardiac biomarkers, including – troponin I and troponin T- in 21 groups of 3 runners each after each individually ran an endurance race of three different lengths – a full marathon, a half marathon and a 10K race. All of the 63 subjects were amateur runners. They also measured levels of biomarkers for cardiac tissue stress. Although there was little differe… more »
Benefits’ of standing over sitting equate to little more than 9 calories an hour
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
Office employees who opt to stand when working are likely to be burning only fractionally more calories than their seated colleagues, according to new research from the University of Bath. The study, published in the journal *Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise*, reveals that the 'benefits' of standing over sitting equate to little more than 9 calories an hour – the equivalent of just one stalk of celery. In fact, purely for weight gain perspective, it would take individuals who opted to stand nearly the entire day to burn just one cup of coffee. Prolonged sitting has become … more »
Low cardiorespiratory fitness could be a warning sign of future problems, even in the fit and healthy
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
Even if you are a fit and healthy person with no signs of any heart or blood vessel disease, low cardiorespiratory fitness could be a warning sign of future problems, according to a study published in the *European Heart Journal* today (Thursday). Cardiorespiratory fitness refers to the ability of the blood circulation and respiratory systems to supply adequate oxygen to muscles during sustained physical activity. The main measure of it is VO2max — the maximum rate of oxygen consumption during exercise that increases with intensity. In the… more »
People with more knowledge about benefits of physical activity may also exercise more
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
Most people have a poor understanding of how much physical activity is good for you, and what health benefits such activity conveys. But the better your knowledge on these topics, the more physical activity you’re likely to get, according to a study published November 28, 2018 in the open-access journal *PLOS ONE*. A study from Central Queensland University in Australia, led by Stephanie Schoeppe, surveyed 615 Australian adults about their physical activity as well as their level of knowledge about physical activity’s health benefits and the risks of inactivity. Based on their answ… more »
Diet
Reduction of salt consumption to prevent cardiovascular disease
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 23 hours ago
The journal *Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Disease* (*NMCD*), has published an important and authoritative statement of the ESAN (European Salt Action Network), a Working group established under the auspices of the World Health Organization (WHO) which includes expert representatives from 39 countries and academic centres, supporting the implementation of population programmes of reduction of salt consumption to prevent cardiovascular disease as recommended by the WHO. “High blood pressure remains the first cause of death, ill-health and disability in the world due to its… more »
Four dried fruits have lower glycemic index (GI) than white bread
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 23 hours ago
People with diabetes and followers of diets based on the glycemic index (GI) can enjoy dried fruits knowing they do not cause a blood sugar spike compared to starchy foods such as white bread, suggests a study published in the journal *Nutrition and Diabetes*. The results of the study also suggest there’s potential for food manufacturers to develop low GI foods with reformulations that include dried fruit, say Dr. John Sievenpiper of Toronto’s St. Michael’s Hospital and researcher Cyril Kendall of the hospital’s Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modi?cation Centre. The glycemic … more »
Frequent red meat consumption = high levels of chemical associated with heart disease
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 23 hours ago
Researchers have identified another reason to limit red meat consumption: high levels of a gut-generated chemical called trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), that also is linked to heart disease. Scientists found that people who eat a diet rich in red meat have triple the TMAO levels of those who eat a diet rich in either white meat or mostly plant-based proteins, but discontinuation of red meat eventually lowers those TMAO levels. TMAO is a dietary byproduct that is formed by gut bacteria during digestion and is derived in part from nutrients that are abundant in red meat. While high sa… more »
What’s behind Mediterranean diet and lower cardiovascular risk
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 3 days ago
A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health offers insights from a cohort study of women in the U.S. who reported consuming a Mediterranean-type diet. Researchers found a 25 percent reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease among study participants who consumed a diet rich in plants and olive oil and low in meats and sweets. The team also explored why and how a Mediterranean diet might mitigate risk of heart disease and stroke by examining a panel of 40 biomarkers, represen
Hazelnuts improve older adults’ micronutrient levels
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 5 days ago
Older adults who added hazelnuts to their diet for a few months significantly improved their levels of two key micronutrients, new research at Oregon State University indicates. In the study, 32 people age 55 and older ate about 57 grams of hazelnuts – 2 ounces or about one-third cup – daily for 16 weeks. Results showed increased blood concentrations of magnesium and elevated urinary levels of a breakdown product of alpha tocopherol, commonly known as vitamin E. The findings, published in the *Journal of Nutrition*, are important because many Americans do not eat adequate amounts of… more »
Rice and barbecued meat can contain harmful toxins
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
Society for Risk Analysis Many of the substances that humans consume on a regular basis as parts of their basic diet actually contain harmful toxins. Rice, barbecued meat and drinking water all pose threats to human health as hosts to potent toxins, carcinogens and opportunistic pathogens. In many cases, the rise in concentrations of these harmful substances is a direct result of human activity, such as the use of harmful pesticides in crops and even advances in green technology. Risk assessment can be a useful tool for determining the actual threat to human health with numerous va… more »
A Mediterranean diet in pregnancy is associated with lower risk of accelerated growth
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
The Mediterranean diet is characterised by a high content of fruits, vegetables, olive oil, legumes and nuts. This healthy diet pattern has been associated with lower obesity and cardiometabolic risk in adults, but few studies have focused on children. This study, published in the *Journal of Pediatrics*, aimed at evaluating the association between adherence to a Mediterranean diet during pregnancy and growth patterns and cardiometabolic risk in early infancy. The study was performed with data of over 2,700 pregnant women from Asturias, Guip├║zcoa, Sabadell and Valencia, who are pa… more »
Supplements
Among older women, the naturally occurring hormone DHEA may preserve bone and muscle mass
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
Women 55 and older have an increased risk of bone and muscle loss but therapy with the hormone Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) may help prevent bone loss and increase muscle mass in older women, according to a new study led by Catherine M. Jankowski, PhD, FACSM, an exercise physiologist and associate professor at the University of Colorado College of Nursing at the Anschutz Medical Campus. The study was published last month in the journal *Clinical Endocrinology* and highlighted in *Endocrinology Today*. Jankowski and colleagues analyzed data from four single-site, double-blinded, pl… more
Routine vitamin B12 screening may prevent irreversible nerve damage in type-2 diabetes
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
Patients with type-2 diabetes, taking metformin, should have their vitamin B12 levels assessed more regularly to avoid irreversible nerve damage, according to a new study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Glasgow. The study findings suggest that earlier detection of vitamin B12 deficiency through routine screening of all metformin-treated, type-2 diabetes patients could reduce their risk of developing irreversible, painful and potentially disabling nerve damage. The increasing incidence of type-2 diabetes is a serious health issue worldwide. Its preva… more »
Anabolic steroids linked to higher rates of premature death in men
Jonathan Kantrowitz at Health News Report – 1 week ago
Men who use androgenic anabolic steroids — such as testosterone — may face a higher risk of early death and of experiencing more hospital admissions, according to a new *Journal of Internal Medicine* study. For the study, 545 men who used androgenic anabolic steroids were matched with 5,450 controls. In addition, 644 men who were sanctioned because they refused to submit to a doping test and 6440 controls were included as a replication cohort. Over an average follow-up of 7.4 years, there were seven (1.3 percent) deaths among users of androgenic ana… more »

No comments: