Monday, June 24, 2019

Latest Health Research - Diet

 

Low-carb diet may reduce diabetes risk independent of weight loss

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 day ago
A low-carb diet may have benefits for people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes even if they don't lose any weight, a new study suggests. Researchers at The Ohio State University wanted to know what happens to obese people with metabolic syndrome, a precursor to diabetes, when they eat a diet low in carbohydrates but don't shed any pounds. They found that more than half of study participants no longer met the criteria for metabolic syndrome immediately following a four-week low-carb diet. The new study included 16 men and women with metabolic syndrome, a cluster of factors that a... more »

Processed foods may hold key to rise in autism

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 day ago
[image: IMAGE] *IMAGE: *Researchers at UCF have dentified the molecular changes that happen when neuro stem cells are exposed to high levels of an acid commonly found in processed foods. view more Credit: University of Central Florida With the number of children diagnosed with autism on the rise, the need to find what causes the disorder becomes more urgent every day. UCF researchers are now a step closer to showing the link between the food pregnant women consume and the effects on a fetus' developing brain. Drs. Saleh Naser, Latifa Abdelli and UCF undergraduate research assistant ... more »

Americans still eat too much processed meat and too little fish

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 day ago
A new study in the *Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics*, published by Elsevier, found that the amount of processed meat consumed by Americans has remained unchanged in the past 18 years, nor has their intake of fish/shellfish increased. In addition, one quarter of US adults are still eating more unprocessed red meat than the recommended level, and less than 15 percent meet the guidelines for fish/shellfish consumption. On a positive note, Americans are eating less beef and more chicken than they did 18 years ago, and in fact, for the first time, consumption of poultry... more »

Plant-based diet leads to Crohn's Disease remission, according to case study

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 day ago
Eating a plant-based diet may be an effective treatment for Crohn's disease, according to a case study published in the journal *Nutrients*. The case study followed a man in his late 20s who had been diagnosed with Crohn's disease after experiencing fatigue, bloating, episodic severe abdominal pain, nausea, and occasional ulcers for several years. His condition did not reach remission after more than a year of intravenous treatment. During his second year of treatment, the patient removed all animal products and processed foods from his diet for a 40-day religious observation and e... more »

Fatty fish without environmental pollutants protect against type 2 diabetes

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 2 days ago
------------------------------ ------------------------------ If the fatty fish we eat were free of environmental pollutants, it would reduce our risk of developing type 2 diabetes. However, the pollutants in the fish have the opposite effect and appears to eliminate the protective effect from fatty fish intake. This has been shown by researchers at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden, using innovative methods that could be used to address several questions about food and health in future studies. Research on the effect of fish consumption on diabetes risk has produced contr... more »

Yogurt may help to lower pre-cancerous bowel growth risk in men

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 3 days ago
------------------------------ Eating two or more weekly servings of yogurt may help to lower the risk of developing the abnormal growths (adenomas) which precede the development of bowel cancer -- at least in men -- finds research published online in the journal *Gut*. The observed associations were strongest for adenomas that are highly likely to become cancerous, and for those located in the colon rather than in the rectum, the findings indicate. Previously published research has suggested that eating a lot of yogurt might lower the risk of bowel cancer by changing the type and vo... more »

Food neophobia may increase the risk of lifestyle diseases

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 4 days ago
Food neophobia, or fear of new foods, may lead to poorer dietary quality, increase the risk factors associated with chronic diseases, and thus increase the risk of developing lifestyle diseases, including cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes. These are some of the findings of a study conducted by the Finnish National Institute for Health and Welfare, the University of Helsinki, and the University of Tartu in Estonia. Food neophobia is an eating behaviour trait in which a person refuses to taste and eat food items or foods they are not familiar with. The study examined the in... more »
 

Low-carb Mediterranean diet had a greater effect on reducing fat around the liver, heart and the pancreas, compared to low-fat diets

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
A research team led by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) Prof. Iris Shai has published a significant long-term study on the impact of Mediterranean and low-carb diets and exercise, measuring their impact with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology to map body fat. In the study, "The Beneficial Effects of Mediterranean Diet Over Low-fat Diet May Be Mediated by Decreasing Hepatic Fat Content," published in the *Journal of Hepatology*, researchers conducted full-body MRI scans of 278 obese subjects, mapping their fat deposits before, during and after the 18-month trial per... more »

Cooking vegetables: healthier with extra virgin olive oil

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
Cooking vegetables in the sofrito (saut√©) with extra virgin olive oil favours the absorption and release of bioactive compounds of its traditional ingredients (garlic, onion and tomato), according to the study conducted by a research team of the Faculty of Pharmacy and Food Sciences at the University of Barcelona (UB), from the Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition Networking Biomedical Research Centre (CIBERobn) and the Diabetes and Associated Metabolic Diseases Networking Biomedical Research (CIBERDEM), led by the tenure lecturer Rosa M. Lamuela. These results, published in t... more »
 

Increasing red meat intake linked with heightened risk of death

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
Increasing red meat intake, particularly processed red meat, is associated with a heightened risk of death, suggests a large US study published in *The BMJ* today. However, reducing red meat intake while increasing healthy protein sources, such as eggs and fish, whole grains and vegetables over time may lower the risk, the researchers say. High intake of red meat, such as beef, pork and lamb, has been previously linked with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, certain types of cancers, and premature death. But little is known about how changes in red meat intake... more »
 
 

Millions of cardiovascular deaths attributed to not eating enough fruits and vegetables S

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
[image: IMAGE] *IMAGE: *This is a percentage of cardiovascular deaths (cardiovascular disease mortality) attributable to suboptimal vegetable intake (less than 400 grams per day) in countries around the world. view more Credit: Global Dietary Database 2010/Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy at Tufts University Baltimore (June 8, 2019) - Preliminary findings from a new study reveal that inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption may account for millions of deaths from heart disease and strokes each year. The study estimated that roughly 1 in 7 cardiovascular deaths could ... more »

Eating habits linked to academic performance

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
*Junk food associated with poorer academic achievement* An analysis of more than 850 elementary school children found those who reported higher consumption of snack foods and sugar-sweetened beverages scored lower on standardized academic tests, on average, than children who consumed less of these foods. While unhealthful diets were not linked to lower cognitive test scores, the findings suggest policies to improve children's diets could help kids do better in school, researchers say. *Hydration associated with better brain functioning* Epidemiological data suggests many children ... more »

Caffeine and L-theanine may help children with ADHD

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
Caffeine and L-theanine, substances found in tea leaves, are known to improve sustained attention in healthy adults. In a new study examining the effects of these substances in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), researchers found five boys with ADHD showed better sustained attention, improved cognitive performance and decreased impulsivity when taking caffeine and L-theanine supplements together compared to a placebo. However, impulsivity increased when either substance was administered alone.

Coffee may lower risk for developing type 2 diabetes

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
A study of more than 4,000 Koreans adds evidence that drinking coffee may lower the risk for developing type 2 diabetes and reveals that a genetic factor could be involved. The researchers found both Korean men and women who drank at least one cup of black coffee a day were less likely to develop prediabetes or type 2 diabetes than those who drank no coffee. The association between drinking coffee and lowered risk for type 2 diabetes was strongest for Koreans with a genetic variation known as rs2074356, which was recently found to be linked with habitual coffee consumption

What and how we eat influences diabetes risk

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
*Fewer new diabetes cases seen in people who eat more plant-based foods * In a study of 2,717 young adults in the U.S. with long-term follow-up, people who increased the amount of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and vegetable oils in their diet over 20 years had a 60 percent lower risk of type 2 diabetes compared to those with a small decrease in plant foods. The findings suggest that long-term shifts toward a more plant-centered diet could help prevent diabetes. *Large study points to importance of vitamins B2 and B6* Findings from a study examining three large cohorts of U.... more »

Study links poor sleep with poor nutrition

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
Many Americans get less than the recommended amount of sleep, and many do not consume the recommended amounts of important vitamins and minerals. A new study suggests the two factors may be connected. The research is based on data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. Compared with people who got more than seven hours of sleep per night--the amount the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends for adults--scientists found that people who got fewer than seven hours of sleep per night on ave... more »

The costs of unhealthy eating

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
*What is the cost of cancers associated with poor diet?* A new analysis reveals that over 5 years, cancers attributable to unhealthy eating among U.S. adults resulted in direct medical costs of $6.9 billion (2015 dollars). Nearly 70 percent of this cost is due to colorectal cancer attributable to poor diet. The calculations are based on the estimated number of cancers cases attributed to not eating enough fruits, vegetables, whole grains and dairy, and eating more processed meats, red meats and sugar-sweetened beverages. Given the substantial economic burden of diet-attributable ca... more »

Reducing obesity-related cancers

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
*How will new added-sugar nutrition labeling affect cancer cases?* A new modeling study estimates that, based on changes in consumer behavior, the soon-to-be-i
 

Millions of cardiovascular deaths attributed to not eating enough fruits and vegetables S

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
[image: IMAGE] *IMAGE: *This is a percentage of cardiovascular deaths (cardiovascular disease mortality) attributable to suboptimal vegetable intake (less than 400 grams per day) in countries around the world. view more Credit: Global Dietary Database 2010/Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy at Tufts University Baltimore (June 8, 2019) - Preliminary findings from a new study reveal that inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption may account for millions of deaths from heart disease and strokes each year. The study estimated that roughly 1 in 7 cardiovascular deaths could ... more »

Eating habits linked to academic performance

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
*Junk food associated with poorer academic achievement* An analysis of more than 850 elementary school children found those who reported higher consumption of snack foods and sugar-sweetened beverages scored lower on standardized academic tests, on average, than children who consumed less of these foods. While unhealthful diets were not linked to lower cognitive test scores, the findings suggest policies to improve children's diets could help kids do better in school, researchers say. *Hydration associated with better brain functioning* Epidemiological data suggests many children ... more »

Caffeine and L-theanine may help children with ADHD

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
Caffeine and L-theanine, substances found in tea leaves, are known to improve sustained attention in healthy adults. In a new study examining the effects of these substances in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), researchers found five boys with ADHD showed better sustained attention, improved cognitive performance and decreased impulsivity when taking caffeine and L-theanine supplements together compared to a placebo. However, impulsivity increased when either substance was administered alone.

Coffee may lower risk for developing type 2 diabetes

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
A study of more than 4,000 Koreans adds evidence that drinking coffee may lower the risk for developing type 2 diabetes and reveals that a genetic factor could be involved. The researchers found both Korean men and women who drank at least one cup of black coffee a day were less likely to develop prediabetes or type 2 diabetes than those who drank no coffee. The association between drinking coffee and lowered risk for type 2 diabetes was strongest for Koreans with a genetic variation known as rs2074356, which was recently found to be linked with habitual coffee consumption

What and how we eat influences diabetes risk

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
*Fewer new diabetes cases seen in people who eat more plant-based foods * In a study of 2,717 young adults in the U.S. with long-term follow-up, people who increased the amount of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and vegetable oils in their diet over 20 years had a 60 percent lower risk of type 2 diabetes compared to those with a small decrease in plant foods. The findings suggest that long-term shifts toward a more plant-centered diet could help prevent diabetes. *Large study points to importance of vitamins B2 and B6* Findings from a study examining three large cohorts of U.... more »

Study links poor sleep with poor nutrition

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
Many Americans get less than the recommended amount of sleep, and many do not consume the recommended amounts of important vitamins and minerals. A new study suggests the two factors may be connected. The research is based on data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. Compared with people who got more than seven hours of sleep per night--the amount the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends for adults--scientists found that people who got fewer than seven hours of sleep per night on ave... more »

The costs of unhealthy eating

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
*What is the cost of cancers associated with poor diet?* A new analysis reveals that over 5 years, cancers attributable to unhealthy eating among U.S. adults resulted in direct medical costs of $6.9 billion (2015 dollars). Nearly 70 percent of this cost is due to colorectal cancer attributable to poor diet. The calculations are based on the estimated number of cancers cases attributed to not eating enough fruits, vegetables, whole grains and dairy, and eating more processed meats, red meats and sugar-sweetened beverages. Given the substantial economic burden of diet-attributable ca... more »

Reducing obesity-related cancers

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
*How will new added-sugar nutrition labeling affect cancer cases?* A new modeling study estimates that, based on changes in consumer behavior, the soon-to-be-implemented added-sugar labeling on all U.S. packaged foods could prevent 35,500 new obesity-related cancer cases and 16,700 cancer deaths over a lifetime in the U.S. The policy would also save an estimated $1.4 billion in direct medical costs. After taking into consideration additional savings from patient time and productivity loss as well as policy implementation costs from both the government and industry, the policy would... more »

Insights on staying healthy when you're 'eating for two'

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
*Evidence that eating well before pregnancy lowers risk of preeclampsia* While scientists aren't sure what causes the dangerous pregnancy complication preeclampsia, or how to prevent it, a new study suggests diet plays a role. Among more than 20,000 pregnancies, researchers found women who followed a healthier diet before getting pregnant were significantly less likely to develop preeclampsia. Diet quality was assessed based on adherence to the American Heart Association dietary recommendations and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern. *New insights on ... more »

Insights on staying healthy when you're 'eating for two'

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 1 week ago
*Evidence that eating well before pregnancy lowers risk of preeclampsia* While scientists aren't sure what causes the dangerous pregnancy complication preeclampsia, or how to prevent it, a new study suggests diet plays a role. Among more than 20,000 pregnancies, researchers found women who followed a healthier diet before getting pregnant were significantly less likely to develop preeclampsia. Diet quality was assessed based on adherence to the American Heart Association dietary recommendations and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern. *New insights on ... more »
 

Posture impacts how you perceive your food

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 2 weeks ago
Summertime is often filled with outdoor parties and food trucks, meaning you're spending more time standing up and eating. But if you want to actually enjoy your meal, researchers say you're better off finding a seat. A new study published in the *Journal of Consumer Research* finds posture impacts taste perception, with food tasting better when you're sitting down. Lead author Dipayan Biswas, PhD, professor of marketing at the University of South Florida, is an expert in cross-modal effects and looked specifically at how the vestibular sense, which is responsible for balance, post... more »

Unsalted tomato juice may help lower heart disease risk

Jonathan KantrowitzatHealth News Report - 2 weeks ago
In a study published in *Food Science & Nutrition*, drinking unsalted tomato juice lowered blood pressure and LDL cholesterol in Japanese adults at risk of cardiovascular disease. In the study, 184 male and 297 female participants were provided with as much unsalted tomato juice as they wanted throughout one year. At the end of the study, blood pressure in 94 participants with untreated prehypertension or hypertension dropped significantly: systolic blood pressure lowered from an average of 141.2 to 137.0 mmHg, and diastolic blood pressure lowered from an average of 83.3 to 80.9 mmH... more »
 

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